Too Tired to Read


It’s a sad state of affairs when a person is too tired to read, but that’s been my condition for the last week. Actually, I have read…but I’ve only been able to read a couple of pages before I find myself nodding off. That’s what happens at the end of a hot day in the classroom (85 degrees this afternoon) and after teaching 27 second graders (training up nicely, but still there are 27 of them!). So, I’m still in the middle of Dracula, making slow progress but enjoying it (if anything could keep me awake it should be this book!), and I’ve also started Susan Hill’s The Woman in Black (which should also keep me awake!). Both books are on my list for Carl’s RIP.II challenge. And for pure pleasure, I’m listening to another Rosamunde Pilcher audiobook on my way to and from school. So you can see that I’m completely scattered and unfocused. But things are beginning to settle down more each day at school, so my reading time and energy should pick up soon and I’ll finish these books and post about them!

In the meantime, in the world of 2nd grade…here are some of the books we’ve read this week in the classroom:

Our first chapter book read aloud is Stuart Little, by E.B. White. We read at least one or two chapters a day, usually after morning recess, and the kids are really enjoying it.
When they come in from our long lunch recess, we cool off and calm down by listening to a picture book, which is something they dearly love to do. This week we’ve enjoyed The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, by Dr Seuss; There’s a Nightmare in my Closet, by Mercer Meyer; The Story About Ping, by Marjorie Flack; and Stone Soup, by Ann McGovern. I have to say that I love looking at those 27 faces when they’re engrossed in listening to a good book.

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15 thoughts on “Too Tired to Read

  1. Chris

    Ah, I miss reading time so much back in those days 🙂 I used to love coming in after recess and listening to the teacher tell me a story. It must be a pretty special feeling to know that you’ll be a part of these kids’ memories and hopefully a part of the start of their passion for books!

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  2. rachele

    Our niece, Emma, is also in 2nd grade this year. She loves to read to me on the phone, and what a wonderful resource your blog will be for me to suggest good books that are aged just right for her.

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  3. Cath

    I would think it would be very nice to be a child in your class. 🙂

    Dracula – just finished it and really enjoyed it. The Woman in Black – one of my favourite ghost stories ever. I saw a dramatisation of it years ago and it frightened the life out of me. LOL!

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  4. Robin

    That’s a very nice thought, Chris. I think a passion for reading can be catchy, so that’s always my hope .

    Hi Rachele, I’ll have to get some suggestions from Emma, too! I’d love to know what her favorite books are this year, and what her teacher is reading to her class!

    Thanks, Donna. The picture books I’m reading to the class right now are all out of our family library, so it brings back very happy memories for me, too!

    Thanks, Cath. The kids seem to be happy right now and are so willing to work and eager to learn. It’s refreshing!
    I’m anxious to get back to my reading…I’m glad you liked Dracula and The Woman in Black. I think they were perfect choices for the RIP-II Challenge!

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  5. mom

    What a nice beginning for those second graders. Reading is magic; it quiets the class and is a perfect memory-maker. Your story brings back special memories of my teaching days.
    mom

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  6. Tara

    I know exactly what you mean about being too tired to read at night. I’m suffering from the same thing. My daughter has trouble listening for more than a few pages to books without pictures (she’ll actually try to sneak away and thinks I won’t notice)…I’m hoping she’ll come around soon since there are so many books I want to share with her.

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  7. Robin

    Hi Mom, reading IS magic…it’s very calming to them (and to me!).

    Hi Tara, it’s a difficult transition from listening to picture books to listening to chapter books. Their attention spans at this age are still pretty short, so right now I’m going for shorter reading sessions, but more often…and I don’t hesitate to interrupt my reading to talk about some of the things happening in the story, in ways that help them relate it to their own lives. Anything to help them understand and engage.
    Most children this age have much stronger visual skills than auditory skills, but your daughter will soon develop a love for listening to chapter books because it’s a lovely shared time with you, and she knows how much you love reading. It’s contagious.

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  8. Gentle Reader

    Love Stuart Little, love the Seuss, love Mercer Mayer! My son read Dracula this summer for a class and liked it, too. It’s no wonder you’re tired, 27 2nd graders, yikes!

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  9. Nan -

    You are absolutely reading! Just different books, that’s all. How I wish I had kept a reading journal when I was reading to my kids. :< ) Times have really changed. I remember a teacher reading Charlotte's Web to my class and it was the 6th grade! Amazing.

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  10. Robin

    Thanks, Gentle Reader…I, too, am loving Stuart Little, Dr. Seuss, Mercer Meyer, and I’m enjoying sharing such treasured books and stories with such an appreciative little (well, not so little) audience.

    Nan, you’re right. I HAVE been reading a lot, just not my usual books. But I’m certainly enjoying this kind of reading at the moment!

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  11. Booklogged

    You mean there are states other than Utah that cram that many children into one classroom?! It’s so important that the lower grades, especially, have smaller numbers. I’m sure you feel the same way.

    You’re doing a wonderful thing by reading to them. I heard the other day of a first grade teacher that didn’t read one book to her class all year. She was fired. Thank heavens. Can you even imagine.

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  12. Lotus Reads

    Are you enjoying “Woman in Black”? The BBC broadcasted a dramatized version of it recently which I downloaded and absolutely loved!

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  13. Robin

    Booklogged, when I taught in Utah, I thought it had the worst class sizes in the nation, but Washington is almost as bad (and there are a few states with even worse numbers!). Smaller classes are so essential in the younger grades, but after having 34 sixth graders last year, I have to argue that big classes are awful for the older kids, too. It’s just impossible to do the job the way it needs to be done, and really meet the needs of each child, with such outrageous numbers.

    Hi Lotus, yes, I’m really enjoying The Woman in Black. I’d love to hear the dramatization of it. I’ll have to track it down and listen to it. Thanks for letting me know about it.

    Hi Jill, it’s really good, isn’t it! I’m loving it, too. Only have a few pages left…

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