Everybody Reads


My daughter-in-law mentioned recently that she was interested in reading the book designated as the 2007 choice for “Everybody Reads” in Portland. I looked it up online (Multnomah County Library) and decided it sounded so good I’d add it to the pile of books on my nightstand. Then I decided to check out the ‘everybody reads’ choices closer to home, and added the Seattle book choice to the pile, too. Neighbor, Vancouver, B.C., hasn’t designated their 2007 book yet, but last year’s book was written by an author my sister-in-law just recommended to me…so that will go on the nightstand pile, too. All of a sudden, I have a whole new set of books waiting for me to finish Out of Africa, which I am reading slowly, story by story, letting it simmer.

I didn’t realize that there is a national ‘everybody reads’ program, also! The National Endowment for the Arts has a program called “The Big Read,” to encourage literary reading. There are seven books chosen for 2007 (January through June), and communities throughout the country have signed up to participate. They can choose which of the seven books to designate as their community’s read. They are all really good books. Some I have already read, but some of them will go on that nightstand, too. All of this reminds me of why I bought my favorite sweatshirt, which always gets a nice comment when I wear it out in public. It has on it an Edward Gorey drawing with the familiar phrase: There’s No Such Thing As Too Many Books!

THE PORTLAND “EVERYBODY READS” CHOICE, 2007.

THE “ONE BOOK, ONE VANCOUVER” CHOICE, 2006.

A “BIG READ” FROM THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS, 2007.

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2 thoughts on “Everybody Reads

  1. lc

    I love the sweater you’re knitting.The style and the color and indeed a lucky grandson. I’m starting the same crossword. Then the picture of the cute little girl. Indeed your love of books started very early. Obviously you liked books off the shelf best which was a favorite daily activity.
    A Farewell to Arms reminded me of a story my husband told me a number of times. As a young boy, his reading of Farewell to Arms was cut short when his uncle informed his mother that it was not a “desireable” book for a young boy to read. A story of censorship but knowing Ray Canning’s nature he would not have been deterred.

    Learning about the books encouraged in different cities is most interesting. Just this week I wondered if Salt Salt Lake City had it’s book suggestion for city-wide reading still going. Mayor Rocky Anderson started such a program a number of years ago but I’ve lost track. Now I must find out about it. Now I’ll add those books to my reading list.

    I’m loving your blog,”A fondness for Reading”.

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  2. Robin

    Thanks, Mom! I’m glad you’re enjoying my blog. You and I have always shared our love of books and stories, so this is another fun way for us to share. I hadn’t heard that story about Dad and A FAREWELL TO ARMS. I’ve never read it, but I definitely will now!

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